Serving soldier Kirtland Gill arrives at Southwark Crown Court, south London, where he is charged with firearms offences, including selling or transferring ammunition, conspiracy to sell or transfer ammunition and possession of a prohibited weapon

Coldstream Guard, 42, who ‘sold Army ammunition’ found with latex gloves and a pistol, court hears

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A Coldstream Guard accused of selling hundreds of rounds of Army ammunition to a member of the criminal underworld was found with latex gloves and a pistol in his shed but claimed ‘coincidence upon coincidence’ in his evidence, a court has heard.

Kirtland Gill, 42, the first Black Regimental Sergeant Major in the Queen’s elite bodyguard unit, allegedly planned to sell bullets with Lance Sergeant Rajon Graham, 33.

Gill, who had a ‘particular responsibility for the protection of the Queen’, was serving as Technical Quartermaster Sergeant at the Victoria Barracks in Windsor, Berkshire at the time.

Hundreds of rounds of ammunition were allegedly sold to ‘D’ – an undercover detective posing as a criminal. 

Duncan Atkinson, QC, questioned whether ‘coincidence on top of coincidence’ could really have happened, including the discovery of a pair of latex gloves in Gill’s house and the police finding a pistol in Gill’s shed when they searched his home in Windsor.

Serving soldier Kirtland Gill arrives at Southwark Crown Court, south London, where he is charged with firearms offences, including selling or transferring ammunition, conspiracy to sell or transfer ammunition and possession of a prohibited weapon

Serving soldier Kirtland Gill arrives at Southwark Crown Court, south London, where he is charged with firearms offences, including selling or transferring ammunition, conspiracy to sell or transfer ammunition and possession of a prohibited weapon

Rajon Graham pictured at Westminster Magistrates' Court on July 1

Rajon Graham pictured at Westminster Magistrates' Court on July 1

Rajon Graham pictured at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on July 1

Gill (pictured centre) had a 'particular responsibility for the protection of the Queen'. The Coldstream Guards is the oldest continuously serving regiment in the Army

Gill (pictured centre) had a 'particular responsibility for the protection of the Queen'. The Coldstream Guards is the oldest continuously serving regiment in the Army

Gill (pictured centre) had a ‘particular responsibility for the protection of the Queen’. The Coldstream Guards is the oldest continuously serving regiment in the Army

Gill is accused of supplying the hundreds of rounds of ammunition that Graham sold for £5,800 to ‘D’, an undercover detective posing as a criminal, handing over bundles of bullets at meetings at a Tesco car park in Windsor.

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Southwark Crown Court has already heard that Gill was responsible for managing the ammunition used in firing practice.

The Coldstream Guards is the oldest continuously serving regiment in the Army. Recognised by their red jackets and black bearskin hats, the unit has a ceremonial role as protectors of royal palaces, including Windsor Castle and Buckingham Palace.

In his closing speech, Mr Atkinson told the jury they may be used to watching crime dramas and thrillers, but they should not treat this case in the same way.

He said: ‘In such a drama, at the end, everything will make sense. To state the obvious, this is reality. Reality is rather more complicated and more untidy. There will be loose ends.

‘Rajon Graham had a source, or sources, of such ammunition. He told ‘D’ he had to get ammunition from someone.

‘No such ammunition was found at Rajon Graham’s address, and he did not have the equipment to make it.

‘Rajon Graham was not acting alone.’

In messages to ‘D’, Graham expresses an interest in drugs as well as ammunition.

In December 2020, Gill said he found a firearm in a Ford Galaxy car that Graham had access to.

‘What steps did he take following that remarkable discovery?’ Mr Atkinson asked.

‘He did not report it to the police or to the Royal Military Police. He did not speak to the man who provided him with the car. He now says that he spoke to Rajon Graham about it.’ 

Gill claimed he called Graham and asked him to come over to his house so he could confront him about it.

This firearm was found by police in Gill’s house when he was arrested on January 28 2021. Gill claimed Graham put it there.

‘Why, having been reprimanded by Mr Gill in December, would Mr Graham have left the firearm in Mr Gill’s shed, where Mr Gill could have found it at any time?’ Mr Atkinson asked.

When Gill was interviewed by the police, he gave no comment.

Mr Atkinson accepted that this was his right, and that he was acting on the advice of his solicitor. But he questioned why Gill would have made no comment if he knew he had a plausible account.

‘If you have done nothing wrong, if you have been dumped in it by someone else, if you have a clear account, then you would speak to the police even if your solicitor had told you not to do so. You would have wanted the police to know that you had done nothing wrong.’

Mr Atkinson also pointed to the fact that Graham had been wearing a pair of latex gloves when he met ‘D’, and that Gill also had a pair of latex gloves in his house.

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‘Mr Gill had a large number of such gloves.’

Mr Atkinson said this demonstrated that Gill had ‘the same care about not leaving DNA or fingerprints’.

He said analysis of cell site areas on 7 December 2020, one of the days Graham met ‘D’, showed that Graham was very close to Gill’s address.

Gill is accused of supplying the ammunition that Graham sold to the undercover officer for £5,800, handing over bundles of bullets at meetings at a Tesco car park in Windsor. Southwark Crown Court has already heard that Gill was responsible for managing the ammunition used in firing practice

Gill is accused of supplying the ammunition that Graham sold to the undercover officer for £5,800, handing over bundles of bullets at meetings at a Tesco car park in Windsor. Southwark Crown Court has already heard that Gill was responsible for managing the ammunition used in firing practice

 Gill is accused of supplying the ammunition that Graham sold to the undercover officer for £5,800, handing over bundles of bullets at meetings at a Tesco car park in Windsor. Southwark Crown Court has already heard that Gill was responsible for managing the ammunition used in firing practice

‘He was going to Kirtland Gill’s address before he could go and see ‘D’. He had to collect something before he could go and see ‘D’.’

Mr Atkinson questioned whether any of this could be a coincidence.

‘Coincidence on top of coincidence on top of coincidence,’ he added.

Gill, of Windsor, who joined the Army in 2001, denies conspiracy to sell or transfer ammunition and possession of a prohibited weapon – an imitation firearm capable of discharging noxious liquid.

Graham, also based in Windsor, has already admitted four counts of selling or transferring ammunition. Mr Atkinson said Graham admitted selling 300 rounds of live 9mm ammunition worth £5,800 to a man he believed to be ‘involved in criminal activity and drug dealing’.

The trial continues.

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